Three Signs that Hydroponics Have Gone Mainstream

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Three Signs that Hydroponics Have Gone Mainstream

Trends move quickly, and many wise and profitable ideas, lifestyles and methods miss the mainstream entirely. Hydroponics have recently moved closer to that mainstream and with the advent of these signs, the urban gardening process matures even further toward gaining the respect it deserves.

Directly Responsible for Cultural Development Worldwide

Hydroponics allows urban dwellers to grow healthy food in limited spaces, directly answering the need for fresh produce in developing nations around the world. Recent news out of Bahrain outlines the intention of the Bahrain government to use hydroponics in an effort to combat food scarcity. With limited land resources and a dry climate, Bahrain and other Middle Eastern countries are utilizing hydroponic technology to expand agriculture. International and national forums addressing these issues have featured hydroponics as a viable solution.

Big Business and Investor Interest

As more and more consumers recognize the value of hydroponics, more and more investors begin to recognize the opportunity to profit from industry stocks. Growlife Inc, a California-based manufacturer of hydroponics systems and the accessories required, has experienced much higher levels of investor interest in their stock, indicating rising confidence in the industry.

That confidence has spread beyond the stock market, as corporate execs get involved in this process. Oracle CEO Larry Ellison has big plans to use hydroponics to produce local, healthy food on the Hawaiian island of Linai. All signs point to hydroponics going mainstream when we consider a project of this scale driven by a man of this nature.

The Rise of Celebrity Endorsements

Although endorsements by movie stars or sports figures pay major dividends in other industries, the endorsement of food experts and celebrity chefs have pushed hydroponics into the global media.

UK entrepreneurs Steven Dring and Richard Ballard run Zero Carbon Food, a thriving grower of produce using hydroponics to supply London, England’s finest restaurants and grocers. Their operation, growing crops just a few miles from the famed Covent Garden market, has drawn the endorsement of Michael Roux Jr., a British celebrity chef and TV personality on the highly popular Masterchef: The Professionals. With an incredible location and the thumbs up for known figures like Roux, the men behind Zero Carbon Food have a bright future ahead.

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